Undergraduate Courses

Latina/o New Haven

Introduction to the field of Latina/o studies, with a focus on community-based research in New Haven. Training in interdisciplinary methods of social research, including oral history, interviews, archival research, cultural analysis, and social documentation. Students design collaborative research projects.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014

Latino New York

The historical presence of Latinas and Latinos in New York City from the late nineteenth century to the present. Differences and similarities among Puerto Rican, Mexican, Cuban, and Dominican communities in the context of New York City history. Complex cultural dynamics as illustrated in novels, poetry, music, and film.

Professor: Albert Laguna
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Wednesday 1.30pm-3.20pm

Mexicans and Mexican Americans since 1848

A survey of Mexican and Mexican American politics and culture in the United States from 1848 to the present. Topics include migration, political activism, racialization, citizenship, and social class.

Not to be taken after ER&M <286>

Professor: Stephen Pitti
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Thursday 1:30pm-3:20pm

Migrant Cities

Study of ways in which migration is changing the contours of global cities. Case studies include Los Angeles, New York, Beirut, Cairo, Dubai, La Paz, and Miami. Social, historical, economic, and theoretical perspectives on modernity and migration.

Professor: Amina El-Annan
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013

Muslim Diasporas in America

Exploration of the meanings and attachments that connect Muslims in the U.S. to homelands in the Muslim world. How to define and apply the concept of diaspora to an ever-broadening set of Muslim populations dispersed in space, including immigrants, expatriates, refugees, guest workers, exiles, and religious seekers. Analysis of newspaper articles, political comics, memoirs, fiction, ethnographies, political essays, sociological surveys, and documentary films.

Professor: Zareena Grewal
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013

Natives and Newcomers in Early America

Intensive survey of American Indian nations and their relationships with colonial regimes. Regional studies are brought together into a continental examination of the structure and significance of colonialism for American Indian peoples up to the early nineteenth century. Emphasis on colonial regimes operating within the political boundaries of the contemporary United States.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday, 3:30pm-5:20pm

Nigeria and Its Diaspora

Nigerians in the modern diaspora, both those who endured forced migration and those who migrated voluntarily. Specific reference to the Igbos and the Yorùbás. The preservation and maintenance of Nigerian culture, history, dance, literature, traditional education, theater, politics, art, music, film, religion, and folklore, especially in African American and Nigerian American contexts.

Professor: Oluseye Adesola
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013

Northeastern Native America, 1850 to the Present

Investigation of American Indian experiences in northeastern North America. Various disciplinary approaches are applied to the study of American Indian peoples and nations in the region

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday, 3:30-5:20

Race and Ethnicity in American Politics

The politics of race and ethnicity in American society examined by a variety of social science methods. Investigation of four general cases: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Hispanic/Latino Americans.

Recommended preparation: PLSC 113b.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Wednesday & Friday 2.30 pm - 3.45 pm

Race and Gender in American Literature

The role of literature in constructing representations of America as an idea, a nation, a colonial settlement, and a participant in world affairs. What kind of place America is and who belongs there; the consequences of America’s history for its national literature. Emphasis on the ways texts represent and contest social concepts of race and gender difference.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tesday and Thursday 2.30 pm -3.20 pm

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