Undergraduate Courses

Ethnography of the African American Community

An ethnographic study of the African American community. Analysis of ethnographic and historical literature, with attention to substantive, conceptual, and methodological issues. Topics include the significance of slavery, the racial ghetto, structural poverty, the middle class, the color line, racial etiquette, and social identity.

Professor: Elijah Anderson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012

From West Africa to the Black Americas: The Black Atlantic Visual Tradition

Art, music, and dance in the history of key classical civilizations south of the Sahara—Mali, Asante, Dahomey, Yorùbá, Ejagham, Kongo—and their impact on New World art and music, especially rock, blues, North American black painting of the past ten years, and black artists of Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil.

Professor: Robert Thompson
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35pm - 12:25pm

Gender, Family, and Cultural Identity in Asia and the United States

A cross-cultural dialogue focusing on family, gender, and identity. An exploration of how specific Asian countries and people approach issues of religion, dress, education, and food as identity markers; U.S. perceptions and reactions to similar issues.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00pm-2:15pm

Genocide and Ethnic Conflict

Exploration of the explosion of genocide and violent ethnic conflict in the past seventy years, including contributory historical and political elements. Consideration of ways to prevent or resolve such conflicts. Focus on questions of identity, religion, class, and nationhood as related to violence and conflict. An analytical framework developed from four case studies: the Holocaust, Cambodia, the former Yugoslavia, and Rwanda.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Wednesday 1.30pm-3.20pm

Global Fictions

Narrative literature from 1850 to the present that takes an idea of the global as its central theme and ultimate frame of reference. Vectors of globalization include energy and transportation, migration and diaspora, religion, sex, disease, and warfare as reflected and refracted in fiction. Novels by Melville, Verne, Kafka, Proust, Abdelrahman, Saro-Wiwa, and Bolaño; films by David Russell and Stephen Gaghan.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012

History of Mexico since Independence

Modern Mexico from the wars of independence in the early nineteenth century to the present. Social, cultural, and economic trends and their relationship to political movements; particular emphasis on the Revolution of 1910 and the long shadow it has cast, and on patterns of relations with the United States.

Professor: Gilbert Joseph
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Thursday, 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm

History of the Jews and Their Diasporas to Early Modern Times

A broad introduction to the history of the Jews from biblical beginnings until the European Reformation and the Ottoman Empire. Focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationships among Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Jewish society and culture in its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval settings.

Counts toward either European or Middle Eastern distributional credit within the History major, upon application to the director of undergraduate studies.

Professor: Ivan Marcus
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11.35-12.50

Individual Reading and Research for Juniors and Seniors

For students who wish to cover material not otherwise offered by the program. The course may be used for research or for directed reading. In either case a term paper or its equivalent is required. Students meet regularly with a faculty adviser. To apply for admission, students submit a prospectus signed by the faculty adviser to the director of undergraduate studies.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012

Introduction to Latino Studies

A critical overview of themes and issues that have shaped the experiences of Latino/a populations in the United States, within an interdisciplinary and hemispheric framework. Topics include U.S.–Latin American relations; the history of ethnic labels; the formation of transnational communities and identities; the politics of language and bilingualism; race, class, and ethnicity; and gender and sexuality.

Professor: Albert Laguna
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30pm-3:20pm

Latina/o Histories

Survey of two hundred years of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Central American, and Cuban American history in the United States. Transnational politics; legacies of European colonialism; labor history; the rise of ethnic nationalism.

Professor: Stephen Pitti
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Wednesday 1.30pm-3.20pm

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