Undergraduate Courses

American Captivity Narratives

Introduction to captivity narratives from colonial and nineteenth-century America. Settler narratives placed in dialogue with slave narratives and Native American pictographic sketchbooks produced in military forts. Contemporary captivity narratives from the U.S. war in Iraq and other conflicts compared with narrative forms and themes from the colonial period.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30pm-3:20pm

American Indian Law and Policy

Survey of the origins, history, and legacies of federal Indian law and policy during two hundred years of U.S. history. The evolution of U.S. constitutional law; political achievements of American Indian communities over the past four decades.

Professor: Ned Blackhawk
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013

American Literary Nationalisms

The influence of nationalist frameworks on American artistic production in the 1960s and 1970s. The treatment of gender expression in nationalist sentiments. Focus on writings by and about the Black Arts Movement, the Chicano Movement, the Young Lords Party, Asian American nationalism, and feminist and queer organizing. Works by Arturo Islas, Alice Walker, Frank Chin, Gloria Anzaldua, Amiri Baraka, and Maxine Hong Kingston.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Wednesday 1.30pm-3.20pm

Asian American History, 1800 to the Present

An introduction to the history of East, South, and Southeast Asian migrations and settlement to the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present. Major themes include labor migration, community formation, U.S. imperialism, legal exclusion, racial segregation, gender and sexuality, cultural representations, and political resistance.

Professor: Mary Lui
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013

Black Sexuality in Literature and Popular Culture

Sexual imagery and content in African American literature and popular culture. Ways that artists and social critics understand the relationship between sexual identity and racial identity. Writers and artists include Alice Walker, Gayl Jones, Spike Lee, Marlon Riggs, Essex Hemphill, Patricia H. Collins, Mark Anthony Neal, and Audre Lorde.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday, 9:25-11:15

Caribbean Fiction

The development of Caribbean literature from the 1930s to the present. Authors include V. S. Naipaul, George Lamming, Jamaica Kincaid, Maryse Conde, and Patricia Powell.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Wednesday 1.30pm-3.20pm

China in the World

A study of literary, linguistic, and cultural issues in China’s interaction with the world from the sixteenth century to the present. Topics include intellectual thought, civilizational clash, translation, migration, fiction, philosophy, scientism, Chinoiserie, race, language, nationalism, ethnicity, globalization, and urbanization. The focus and period vary from year to year; for fall 2012, emphasis is on the twentieth century and beyond.

Professor: Jing Tsu
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012

Comparative Ethnic Studies

Introduction to the methods and practice of comparative ethnic studies. Examination of racial formation in the United States within a transnational framework. Legacies of colonialism, slavery, and racial exclusion; racial formation in schools, prisons, and citizenship law; cultural politics of music and performance; social movements; and postcolonial critique.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013

Cuban America

The history and cultural production of the Cuban diaspora in the United States from the nineteenth century to the present. The course uses periodicals, essays, novels, film, music, and television to track the historical, political, and cultural evolution of Cuban American communities, with an eye toward the future.

Professor: Albert Laguna
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Wednesday 1.30-3.20

Ethnicity, Indigeneity, Mobility

Classic literature on ethnicity in conversation with more recent work on indigeneity and mobility. Relationships among place, belonging, and citizenship in shaping contemporary identity practices and discourses. Focus on South Asia, with attention to Latin America, Native North America, Southeast and East Asia, Australia/New Zealand, and Africa.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Wednesday, 9:25-11:15

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